Tips for Job Applicants

STARTING YOUR JOB SEARCH

RESEARCH YOURSELF

Hiring managers often look for information about applicants online. Research your online footprint and determine whether or not you need to restrict privacy on any social media. You may also benefit from establishing and updating a LinkedIn profile, to direct research on you to your professional online CV.

Take care of what you post online. Any crude or discriminatory statements may influence your application for a new job.

Tips for Applicants Post 20170406 Research Yourself

NETWORK

Utilise your networks to advertise your availability in the job market. Former military colleagues who are now in the civilian workforce make great contacts. Many people find their next role through their network.

BUILD RAPPORT

Throughout your job hunt you will meet or speak to a variety of new people. Make sure you are friendly and stay connected to these people to expand your network and be front of mind for future opportunities.

 

APPLYING TO THE RIGHT JOB FOR YOU

UNDERSTAND THE JOB

Make sure that you've read the job advertisement thoroughly. Ensure you understand the role you are applying for and that it is suited to your skills and qualifications.

MAKE CONTACT

If you have any questions after you've read the role advertisement thoroughly, get in touch with hiring managers to discuss any valid questions you have about the role. All NSW Government jobs should list a point of contact on the advert.  

Tips for Applicants Post 20180427 Networking

LET US KNOW WHEN YOU APPLY FOR ROLES

Our team continuously brief hiring managers in NSW Government on the transferable skills of ADF personnel and how they would make great team members.

Contact us when you apply for a role. If we haven't already, we will endevour to reach out to brief the hiring manager on the Veterans Employment Program.

 

STARRING IN YOUR INTERVIEW

INTERVIEW PREPARATION

If you are asked to interview for a position, utilise the Capability Definition Tool to give you an idea of the sorts of questions which may be asked in an interview to gauge your skills and experience, at a given capability level.

Reach out to people with experience in that team or industry to speak about the culture, work and any challenges or changes ahead for the team. Any insights are valuable for your confidence and relevant responses in the interview. You could ask a friend to quiz you on your experience and check whether your responses provide examples which are relevant to the role you’re applying for.

INTERVIEW PREPARATION - DOCUMENTS

Bring a copy of your application and CV to the interview. Also, bring any relevant sample work and a list of relevant questions for the panel. Remember, you are gaining extra information about this new role to determine if it is a fit for you, just as much as the selection panel is considering your suitability.

INTERVIEW PREPARATION - STRUCTURE

Before an interview, you are entitled to know the people who will be sitting on the interview panel and the format the interview will take. Some interviews may feature small tasks or tests. It is best to make sure you are aware of this interview structure before the day.

INTERVIEWING - TAKE YOUR TIME

If you need to take time to formulate a response to interview questions, then do so.  It is acceptable to ask the interviewer to repeat the question if needed, to ensure you understand all aspects of what they want answered. 

You can also rephrase the question to the interviewer to confirm that you understand what they are asking.

Another tip to give you a few moments to collect your thoughts is to take a sip of water.

Don't use the same technique every time, as this will become distracting to the interviewer. 

Tips for Applicants Post 20170413 Interview Preparation Structure

RESPONDING TO INTERVIEW QUESTIONS

Structure your response to application and interview questions using the STAR model. Use this model so you can avoid rambling and keep on track! Consider specific examples to demonstrate and quantify your success. 

What is the STAR model?

The STAR model is one way of presenting information against focus capabilities. For each capability, think about the following and use these points to form sentences:

  • Situation - Set the context by describing the circumstance where you used the skills or qualities and gained the experience.
  • Task - What was your role?
  • Actions - What did you do and how did you do it?
  • Results - What did you achieve? What was the end result and how does it relate to the job you are applying for?